Am I Eligible?

​At your first appointment, your DORS counselor will help you apply for services and will gather information about you that will help find out if you are eligible for DORS services.

In order to be eligible for DORS services, you must have a physical or mental disability that seriously affects your ability to work, and you must need employment rehabilitation services in order to get or keep a job.

If you receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), you are presumed eligible for DORS services.

What should I bring to my first appointment?

Bring medical records about your disability, school or job training records, and a list of the places and dates of the jobs you have had.

What will happen next?

You will hear from your DORS counselor within 60 days letting you know if you are eligible for DORS services and what your category of eligibility is (“significant” or “most significant” disability).

If I am eligible, when will I get DORS services?

That depends on how serious or "significant" your disability is. 
Since DORS does not have enough money or staff to serve everyone who is eligible, DORS will determine if you have a "significant," "most significant," or "non-severe" disability. By law, DORS is required to provide services to people with most significant disabilities first.
Most of the time, you would be considered to have a significant disability if you have a physical or mental disability that limits your ability to function in one or more of these areas:
  • The ability to walk.
  • The ability to use your arms and hands.
  • The ability to talk.
  • The ability to take care of your personal needs.
  • The ability to get along with others.
  • The ability to adapt to the work place. 
If you are blind or deaf, have moderate or severe cognitive disabilities, or have epilepsy (and have not been seizure-free for two years), you automatically meet the definition of a significant disability.
You may be considered to have a most significant disability if there are substantial limitations in three or more of those areas.
If you have a disability that has a mild effect on working and you do not have a serious limitation in the functional areas (non-severe), DORS will not be able to provide services. You may want to get help with employment from a One-Stop Career Center or a community college.
Even if you have a significant or most significant disability, there may be a waiting list for services.
Three women sitting in an office. Two of the women are talking using ASL, the third is taking notes.
Don't forget to bring any medical, school and job training records you may have as well as a list of your previous jobs to the first appointment with your DORS counselor.